Sex During Pregnancy

Lamaze International

There are some common myths about sex during those 40 weeks of pregnancy. Remember to consider your relationship (is it healthy? Am I doing this for me?) and protect against sexually transmitted infections (STIs) before considering sexual contact. 

MYTH: Most women do not want sex during pregnancy

FACT: In truth, each woman's libido (desire for sex) is different during pregnancy. A woman may feel very sexy with one pregnancy and be less interested during another pregnancy. Most women enjoy sex throughout their pregnancy without complications. 

MYTH: Most pregnant women do not need lubricant during sexual activity

FACT: While some women report adequate arousal and enhanced lubrication during pregnancy, some women report the opposite - everybody is unique. Try a natural water-based ph-balanced lubricant or a slick and slippery silicone one for some added lubrication. 

MYTH: Sex during pregnancy will harm the baby

FACT: The baby is protected in the amniotic fluid sac, so sexual activity will not hurt the baby. Old wives' tales of sex during pregnancy causing a cleft or dimple in a baby's chin are untrue. 

MYTH: Sex causes premature labor contractions

FACT: Women can experience many contractions without going into active labor, causing cervical dilation. Oxytocin can increase with breast stimulation and/or orgasm resulting in an increase in contractions, especially near the end of a pregnancy. Sex alone is not known to cause labor, as there are a number of other changes, such as hormonal, that occur to determine when labor will begin. 

MYTH: Oral sex isn't OK

FACT: Oral sex is a sensual activity that many couples enjoy whether they are pregnant or not. One of the most common challenges deals with concerns about an air bubble being blown into the women's blood stream or causing a woman discomfort. A partner should be careful not to blow air forcefully and directly into the vagina.